Tag Archives: clean out your closet

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #12 – Folding

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #12 – Folding

If you’ve read the book and are joining the fray, then you understand that folding is a big part of the KonMari method clothing cleansing/storing experience. Of course, the book I’m referring to is Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. And, if you’ve been following along with me on my KonMari journey, then you know that I’ve dealt with the folding issue in some of my previous blog posts.

My first introduction to the KonMari folding method was to watch videos on YouTube. The folding seemed easy enough but I wasn’t sure that it would a) save enough space to be worthwhile and b) keep the clothing from wrinkling.

I can understand the whole bonding with your clothing idea and by touching each piece every time you fold it, you can identify areas that might need repair, or even that the piece of clothing has outlived its usefulness although it still brings you joy. But, I’m still not totally sold on the concept.

Just so you know, I’ve always liked to fold certain clothing items. If it goes in a drawer, it’s folded. I’ve also worked many years in retail and I love the look of perfectly folded displays. However, the KonMari Method suggests a different way of folding clothing which required a tweak to my previous habits.

Mastering the technique is pretty simple. Once you fold a few pieces, you develop a rhythm that sustains you through the pile. It kind of reminds me of when I used to spend an evening ironing. It’s almost like active meditation.

However, I’m the kind of person who likes to hang the majority of my wardrobe. To me, out of sight is out of mind. That may explain why my folded shirt drawers – although they look marvelous! – are in such great condition almost two years after their initial KonMari fold. Since the tops are no longer hanging, I forget I have them and often choose something else while I’m in the closet. On the upside, I was able to fit a large quantity of tops into two drawers which opened up hanging space for new purchases!

I’m not convinced that folding works for everything except dresses, coats and jackets or flowy tops. I feel a lot depends on fabric and frequency of use, and some items are too difficult or small to fold. I suspect that many people who have cleansed their wardrobes with the KonMari method will have relatively minimal wardrobes left so everything will get used regularly. That’s not me!

I opted to fold some items because, as I stated in one of my first posts on this journey, I wanted to more efficiently use the space I had, both in my closet and in my drawers. I have a lot of stuff to fit into a small space, so folding seems to make sense. Once I’ve had a chance to completely redo my closet, I’ll have a better idea of how it all works for me. My closet is supposed to be big enough for two and even after this initial cleaning, I’m having trouble fitting just me in it.

When you watch the videos of KonMari folding, everything looks wonderful when it’s initially folded and the drawer is full. To me, the issue is just how quickly it can get ugly once you start pulling items out. You have to regularly adjust what’s left to keep some semblance of organization.

I’ve seen on blogs several people who have absorbed the KonMari Method of folding, and use it not only at home but to pack their suitcases and set up their hotel rooms. I suspect, now that I’m utilizing this method, I’ll continue to do so for years to come, but I will also hang as much as I can.

I feel your relationship with your clothing is very personal but also something we all struggle with, particularly when it comes to organizing everything. We forget what we have which is why utilizing closet/clothing/style apps help. However, they do take time to maintain and I must admit, I’ve fallen away from using mine. I just have higher priorities at the moment, but I think they’re amazing aids and I wish I had mine updated.

Now, before I digress further, here are a few pointers regarding my KonMari folding experience.

  1. Watch videos. There are several on YouTube, not only by Kondo, but by several people who follow the KonMari Method. I highly recommend watching the videos before you begin your folding phase.
  2. Use plastic. I know Kondo suggests using leftover shoe boxes and lids for small item storage, but I much prefer plastic. Cardboard is susceptible to dust, bugs and dampness. Even in a drawer, cardboard gets dusty and dirty and is just too difficult to clean. Plastic can be washed and dried at will, and if you buy the clear plastic, you can actually see what’s in there. My vote is for plastic.
  3. Cut the tags. Kondo suggests cutting all tags so your clothes will feel wanted and part of your life. I’m paraphrasing here. Anyway, I struggled with this at first. Sometimes you like to know which tops are new, particularly when it comes to camis, tamis and tanks. There are times when you absolutely want to wear a new one, and once you cut the tags, that easily identifiable designation is gone. However, if you’re going to fold, you quickly discover that the tags get in the way. Even when I was sorting, the tags kept tangling. So, I caved, dug out the scissors and cut the tags.
  4. Look at the big picture. Once you’ve cleaned through all your clothes, they need to be organized in a manner that works for you. It might mean emptying everything – again! – so you can decide how best to locate your clothing. Coats in the coat closet. Pajamas in the night stand. Scarves on a hanger. Figure out how you’ll best utilize everything you own, then organize it that way. Not everything has to be folded.
  5. Fold smoothly. Be sure to smooth each item out before you fold it, otherwise the creases will likely remain. Some items are easier to do than others, and some, like pajamas, you might not care as much if there is a wrinkle or two.
  6. Fix what you see. The good thing about folding is that you do see every inch of an item you’re folding. Tears, snags, falling hemlines, and so on, become ever more obvious. Also, you can see when a piece of clothing needs to be tossed due to wear. I sadly donated a few shirts when I got up close and personal with them.
  7. Do what’s best for you. Remember, in the end, the KonMari Method is simply the suggestion of one organizer who wrote a book. Fold or not fold. Your clothing is up to you.

I’d love to hear your comments on how you’re adapting to KonMari folding and organizing your clothing. Leave your comments below!

Next up, more random thoughts and what I’ve learned so far. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

 

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #11 – Clothing Summary

Magic of Tidying Up

Well, I’ve completed all the categories when it comes to my clothing, so a quick summary of my work is in order. As for the tidying, i still have items in my closet that will be cleaned in future categories, so I haven’t completely tidied it yet. My dresser and nightstand drawers are in much more organized condition and remain that way, but the closet is still a work in progress. We’ll have to wait until i finish the whole house before I can show the difference. However, I wanted to touch on a few points regarding my clothing cleansing process. In case you’re wondering, I’m following the recommended category order detailed in Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing.

It’s possible there’s a major mind shift that takes place when you actually put all your clothes into one big pile. the overwhelming feeling of how much stuff we have just in clothing! Due to the limited amount of space I have, plus the fact that I take care of my Mom and it’s not possible to have a big mess all day just to satisfy Kondo’s requirements, it wasn’t practical for me to follow the KonMari method to the letter. Still, I was amazed at how much clothing I had in my wardrobe.

I think something else that happens when you put all your clothes into such a big pile is you realize that so much of what you own is not who you are. I didn’t have the big “Ah-hah!” moment because I did my discarding by sub-category, but even though I had already done a good purge about a year ago, looking at all my clothes within a short period, rather than just picking through the racks, showed me that i had several items that were good for me a few years ago but it just wasn’t who I am now.

As I write this, even though I’ve already driven my donations to the Goodwill and set aside a number of items to eBay, i’ve decided to let go of even more. Some items became more apparent once I started to catalog my wardrobe in the Stylebook app. Others came about because they nagged at me as they hung in the closet, or I decided to try on a few things and realized some shoes will always hurt and there’s just no getting over it no matter how much I love them. So, in addition to the tallies presented below, I’d say there will be an additional garbage bag and a number of eBay items to go into the pile. And, it feels good!

Here are the bags of clothing I donated to Goodwill.

I’ve noticed that now that i’ve pared down my wardrobe, I’m more creative in putting outfits together and I’m using items I rarely if ever used because I kept wearing the same things. The very first time I had to make a choice after I cleaned through my closet, I admit, I felt a bit of apprehension; I was definitely a bit anxious. I just took a deep breath and dove right in. It really wasn’t that scary after all. Now I challenge myself to wear different things. I pretty much have no choice. All the old stuff is gone.

One key reason for working through the KonMari method, at least regarding my closet, was that I wanted to make more efficient use of my space. Well, there’s less in it, but I’m not so sure I totally accomplished my goal. However, making my clothes look pretty is definitely an accomplishment! Folding items that need to be folded makes those areas look very organized. I often want to open my drawers to look at how neat everything is.

In my closet, I switched to the Huggable Hangers about two years ago. I couldn’t decide which color to get, so I went with gray. At the time, they didn’t offer a color that I wanted to use. Well…since then they introduced a vibrant violet purple! I was able to get enough hangers for my closet for a screamin’ deal and now my closet really vibrates with great energy.

Kondo mentions in her book that we should cut the tags from our clothes when we bring them home so they can fully feel part of our wardrobe. I hemmed and hawed about that for a while, in the end agreeing with her. As I was going through my hanging things, the tags kept getting tangled up; it was a nightmare. When it came time to fold, the tags would get in the way or snag. So, i dug out the scissors and cut the tags. Now my clothes are happier.

Kondo also suggests organizing your clothes from the heaviest and longest on the left to the shortest and lightest on the right. If I had just a simple closet on one wall, that might work. However, mine is two short walls and I need space on both of them. I always organized my clothes by category, and within each category I organized from light to dark, from short to long within each color. I think for the time being I’m going to continue to do so because I’ve done it that way for a number of years and it more easily fits my space.

These are some of the items I decided to keep.

I do have some evening gowns that I have no idea how to store. I love them and they bring me joy just to touch. However, they are long and bulky and can’t be hung due to their weight. Maybe once I’m done with the whole house I’ll figure it out.

In all, I parted with about 45 percent of my wardrobe. Maybe 50 percent. I’m still tossing. I had no idea I had that much that needed to go. My whole closet feels different when I slide open the door. It’s a really fabulous feeling, and once I get through the rest of the non-clothing that’s in my bedroom (when those categories come up), I just might accomplish my goal after all.

Before we get to books, I’ll still have a couple of posts on my thoughts on clothing per the KonMari method. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

Planning – 3 Business Rules for 2017 and Beyond

Normally, once Saturday Night Live is over, I’m busy doing something. As a night owl, I’m often off the sofa and into my office to work on my lengthy to-do list. But, a few weeks ago, I was a bit tired and didn’t get up before the next program began. And, I’m very glad!

Immediately following SNL, at least in this market (Las Vegas), is Your Move with Andy Stanley. Now, I’d only seen the program a couple of times, but that night’s talk really hit home, with one slight twist. Stanley was addressing viewers to make changes in their personal lives. However, I had my business hat on that day and before he spoke a word, once I saw the bullet points on the screen, I immediately went into entrepreneur mode.

Stanley wanted you to look deep inside you to make the changes necessary to become the person you’re desiring to sit across the table from you, the perfect mate. If viewed from the other’s perspective with your checklist, do you match up? I’d heard this advice before, but my business brain was running a mile a minute on his bullet points. So let’s take a look.

Here are Andy Stanley’s Three Rules:

  1. Get out of debt
  2. Stay out of bed
  3. Clean out your closet

Now, aside from the first one, you may be wondering how the next two apply to business. Let’s take them one by one.

Get out of debt. Some people advise you to leverage, leverage, leverage. When it comes to debt, I’m advising to be debt-free. The less debt you have, the more control you have over your company. As a solopreneur or small business owner, if you don’t owe anyone money, then you have more money to keep the doors of your business open longer. You’ll make wiser decisions because if you’re spending your money and not someone else’s, you are apt to be very cautious when signing on the dotted line. If you’re debt-free with savings in the bank, you have a more solid foundation on which to grow your business.

If you have a type of business that requires a large capital outlay and it will be a few years to get those loans down to zero, at least pay off your personal debt. Your individual credit score might be required in order to secure financing for your business. And, if you’re looking to woo a potential partner, investor or company to acquire your business, the prettier the balance sheet, the better chance you have of finding that perfect one that checks off all the boxes on your list.

Stay out of bed. Here, Stanley was suggesting you not sleep around, and while that’s good advice for the business environment as well, I immediately thought in different terms. If I were to use this bullet, I would say Get out of bed.

So many people start a business not knowing the immense amount of time and effort required just to get it off the ground, let alone maintain. If you’re lying in bed instead of working on your to-do list and reviewing your goals to see where you can move forward, your business is doomed.

You don’t even have to own a business to make sense of this advice. Taking the time to improve your skills, get a better education, network with people in your desired industry, research requirements for the job you want – they all require that you spend some time in the full upright position.

I’m not advocating you never take time off. On the contrary, rest is essential to having the endurance to be a successful business owner. Lazing around and complaining that nothing ever goes your way will have quite the opposite effect.

Clean out your closet. Dealing with past emotional baggage was the point Stanley was making here, and that’s not bad advice for a business owner. However, I took it literally. Clean out your closet. And your basement. And your garage. And any other place that’s cluttered! Clean!

Why clean? First of all, a clean environment is healthy and conducive to inspiring thought. If you only see clutter around you, your brain has a hard time slogging through the mess before it can focus on creativity. If you’re looking at a clean and organized interior landscape, surrounded by things that make you happy, your starting point for work is significantly better.

Some people say they can’t find the money to start their business. Well, it might be sitting in your garage or the back of your hall closet. Clean out and sell items you’re not using. You might fetch a few thousand, or at least a few hundred, which could be enough to get your website going and business cards designed and printed. Accomplishing a whole house cleanout will also boost your confidence to accomplish those sometimes-scary business tasks. Just don’t waste the money you gain. It can dribble in as things may sell one by one and take a period of time for everything to sell. Set the money aside so you have all the dollars ready to work for your new business.

As you can see, the same words can mean different things to different people, depending on your perspective and state of mind at the time. Andy Stanley was working on your spiritual self while I saw the words from a business perspective. Still, good advice whichever side you’re on!

What are your thoughts? Can you relate to any of these three scenarios? I’d love to hear about your experiences.

Enjoy!

Cindi