Tag Archives: KonMari

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #14 – Books Part 2

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #14 – Books Part 2

Well, I must say, if books are taking me this long, I can’t wait to get to paperwork! I thought I could recap with just two blog posts, but alas, I was wrong.

I’m continuing with my KonMari journey per Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing, working my way through all the books. Determining which to keep and which to donate is not the problem; figuring out how and where to display what I have left is.

I like to keep my books together by subject or category. Meandering my way through my bookshelves, I discovered some categories have just two or three books. Others easily transcend two to three shelves!

As I said in my previous books post, I want to focus on the display as well as the collection, so I had to think outside my box when it came to properly addressing these smaller categories. In addition to display, I want to make sure I can see each title. I’d previously had so many books piled onto shelves I couldn’t find what I needed or purchased the same one a second time because I didn’t realize I already owned it. My goal is books I love displayed in a way that reflects my personality and is a joy to view, along with ease of finding them when I need to.

Several years ago, I spoke with a professional organizer who said to move things out of the way so that you can set things up how you want. Then, deal with the excess. I took that to heart with a console table next to my desk. I’d had several display items on it, none of which I intended to keep. I also wanted to have room for family photos. I’d previously put some on bookshelves behind me where I couldn’t see them while I worked. What fun is that?

So, in one fell swoop, I cleared the table, set up some photos and placed my MSU Sparty figure atop three Michigan State books – a category that seemed wasted on the bookshelf. I can now appreciate everything on the table, enjoy Sparty who is energized and focused, and easily glance through the beautiful campus photos whenever I’m in the mood to reminisce. Yay!

I’m also blessed to have a sister with a good eye for design and who understands my quirkiness. Occasionally, I’ve needed her help and she’s offered great advice! I tend to like things less crowded so at times I’m not good at displaying multiple items on a shelf, but she can see right through that and meet me in the middle.

She’s also the one who says, if you love something, buy it. You’ll find a place for it. Maybe not right away…A few years ago, I purchased two glass mosaic heart-shaped vases by Debi Lilly, the smaller one in purple and the larger in red. I didn’t know where I would use them, but I loved them. They’ve sat on one of my nightstands ever since. However, while I was working on my bookshelves, I needed something interesting to fill a void. I grabbed the purple one and filled it with a strand of fairy lights. OMG! It looks so cool on my shelf when it’s lit! However, my sister suggested moving it up a shelf, and bringing my gold IKEA crown up to replace it. I balked at first, thinking it was too crowded, but she was completely right. The crown deserved to be seen and the purple vase fits perfectly on the higher shelf. Now I need a place for the red one.

I had originally put the crown on the shelf it’s on now, but I moved it to the bottom one because all my Princess Diana and other Royal books were there. I used it to separate the Princess Diana books from the others, which I’m sure she would appreciate and seemed appropriate for the category. But the crown really was too pretty to be hidden and I’m glad I changed its location. I ordered simple lighted mercury glass spheres by Valerie Parr Hill and I think the largest one will work perfectly there.

In the photo above, you see two of my completed shelves. The top one is all of my Richard Branson books. I’m a big fan. So much so I had no idea how many books I had! I also owned the shaking hands piece, and I felt that the two of them belonged together, since Branson has built his fortunes on partnership.

The second shelf contains classics like Rich Dad, Poor Dad and The Millionaire Next Door. I added the Believe sign and candles as inspiration. 

Here are some tips for displaying your books:

  1. Treasure hunt. Bring together items in your house or perhaps in storage that reflect the mood you want for your bookshelf. You can have more than just books on the shelves! 
  2. Leave some breathing room. It’s important to not over stuff the shelves. You want to be able to enjoy and use them, not just have them serve a utilitarian purpose.
  3. Grid it. I spoke about this in my last blog post. Identify what goes where, including accessories. Put it on the grid but see how it looks and feels once you have it in place. I moved a few shelves to different locations. On paper they made sense, but I didn’t like the way they looked or felt.
  4. Light it up! If your shelves don’t have built-in lighting, purchase some! It makes such a difference, particularly if they’re on timers. I used a variety of things from microlights to flameless candles. Put them in and around things. I’m normally a very balanced person when it comes to display, but I loved mixing it up, putting light in different locations. 
  5. Stack them and line them up. Books don’t have to only lie down or stand. Mix it up! Just be sure you can see all the titles and they are organized in a manner that makes it easy for you to find them. If you really want a cohesive look, wrap them all in kraft paper and use a label maker to put titles on the spines. I don’t have the patience for this, but it does look very pretty!
  6. Categorize. Decide how best for your to locate your books when the time comes. Do you prefer category, topic, author, title or some other way? Mine is done by category, then display. As long as the book is on the right category shelf, I’ll find it. I’ve really limited my books (for me, anyway!) so it’s easy-peasy!

I haven’t completed the book step in the KonMari method yet, but I’ve noticed that I’m really happy when I walk into my office and see how organized my bookshelf is becoming, particularly at night when all the lights come on. I have six more shelves plus the top of the bookcase to organize, plus books in other areas of the house. I’m taking my time. I have lots of other projects I’m working on!

There will be at least one more blog post regarding books, but I’ll also be posting some images on Instagram, so be sure to check it out!

How do you organize your books? Have you started a new routine when it comes to buying/reading/storing books? Leave your comments below.

Next up, Books Part 3. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

 

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #13 – Books Part 1

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #13 – Books Part 1

As a writer, I tend to read a lot, which means I own a ton of books. However, as I continue in my KonMari journey, I wanted to use my bookshelf in my office to not only house books but display items that bring me joy as well. And, my project binders.

Several years ago, I was all about accumulating as many interesting books as I could, to one day have a dedicated library in my house. I envisioned myself drinking tea beside a huge window, surrounded by floor to ceiling books. However, every time I moved, there were more and more super heavy boxes of books that no one – including the movers – wanted to lift. The more books I had, the more bookshelves I needed. It was an endless cycle.

A couple of moves ago, I decided not to take three bookshelves with me to my new home. I donated over 500 books to the library, followed by another 200 once I settled into my new place. Some books I read. Some I would never read. Almost all of them nonfiction.

Basically, what was left is what I now have, and it’s still too much. In fact, at times I have forgotten I own a particular book and buy a second or third copy. It’s frustrating that there are so many books on the shelves that I can’t get to the ones I want. It’s time to purge!

I also wanted to bring some light and air to my bookshelf, which sits behind my desk in my office. When I walk into my office, I want to be inspired and happy to look at the bookshelf, not be distracted or annoyed by the mess.

Marie Kondo, in her book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizingsays to put all your books in one pile and purge from there. I couldn’t do that. I had to take it shelf by shelf, which was organized by topic. Even cleaning through my books that way I’ve had stacks on the floor for several days while I decide on the new layout for my bookshelf. It would have been a nightmare with all of them on the floor at the same time!

As I touched each book, I determined if it deserved a place in my home. If so, it went into Pile A. If not, Pile B, whereupon I noted all the pertinent information (title, author, ISBN, price) onto a handy dandy spreadsheet. I always keep track of books I donate or sell. That way, I won’t buy them again – hopefully. Then, I checked Amazon to see if they were worth selling. Most were not. So, they were put into a box and packed into my car to deliver to the library.

However, there were some that didn’t fit into either category. They didn’t deserve to stay, but I really wanted to read them before I sent them on their way. I know, Kondo says to just give them away, but I truly believe I will make it through this pile. Alas, Pile C needed a home.

As I worked through the shelves, I had to decide what I wanted where. So, I did my usual – I drew a quick sketch of the bookshelf on a piece of paper, identified what I knew and listed the book categories that still needed a home. (I use this same method for kitchen cupboards, bedroom closets/furniture and anything else that can be put on a grid. It helps me to think things through.)

I’m about halfway done, and it’s been a challenge. I cannot believe how many books I can squeeze onto a shelf! (These are really deep.) I’ve always been good at organizing things, I guess to the point where I have far more than I need of some items.  

So far, I’ve donated about another 100 books, added about as many into Pile C, with many more books to go. However, what I’ve done I’m thrilled with! I just love walking into my office and seeing the clean shelves, lights and words of inspiration.

Here are some tips for cleaning through your books:

  1. Bit by bit. If you have a lot of books, take it a bit at a time. It gets too confusing when you have books all over the place. When you want to put them back on a shelf, you won’t be able to find it. If your books bring you joy, there’s no reason to toss them, but be realistic.
  2. Decide on the use. Do you just want to pile your books on your bookshelves, or do you want to use the shelves for other things as well, such as display items, awards, photos, or office items. You have to make that decision before you start to put things back.
  3. Make a grid. I find it’s best for me to make a list of all the categories I need to put into a particular space, make a grid, then decide where they go. Sometimes it’s decided on the grid. Other times I put the item away then note it on the grid and cross it off the list. It just helps to keep you organized so you don’t forget anything crucial.
  4. Clean it! Once the shelves are empty, do a good beeswax dusting and let it sit overnight before you put anything back. Let the beeswax do its job. It’s not often the shelves are completely empty, so take advantage while you can.
  5. Feel the energy. I’ve changed the layout of some of the shelves several times, until I felt it was right. I even changed the location of two or three categories because, while they looked good on my grid, I didn’t like the way it felt on the shelf. 
  6. Light it up! I’ve had so much fun using the inexpensive LED fairy lights on timers to light up my bookshelves. I’ve even used flameless pillar candles and lighted candle bases. It’s so exciting to walk into my office and see everything lit up. It increases my energy immediately.

I’ll do a final blog post once I’ve finished, and post photos on Instagram, but I thought I’d share what I’ve done so far. This is such a tough category for me, particularly if you’re an avid reader like I am. And, I keep my cookbooks and art books in other rooms. So, more mess to make!

I’d love to hear your comments on how you’re using KonMari to sort through your books. Leave your comments below!

Next up, Books Part 2. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

 

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #12 – Folding

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #12 – Folding

If you’ve read the book and are joining the fray, then you understand that folding is a big part of the KonMari method clothing cleansing/storing experience. Of course, the book I’m referring to is Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing. And, if you’ve been following along with me on my KonMari journey, then you know that I’ve dealt with the folding issue in some of my previous blog posts.

My first introduction to the KonMari folding method was to watch videos on YouTube. The folding seemed easy enough but I wasn’t sure that it would a) save enough space to be worthwhile and b) keep the clothing from wrinkling.

I can understand the whole bonding with your clothing idea and by touching each piece every time you fold it, you can identify areas that might need repair, or even that the piece of clothing has outlived its usefulness although it still brings you joy. But, I’m still not totally sold on the concept.

Just so you know, I’ve always liked to fold certain clothing items. If it goes in a drawer, it’s folded. I’ve also worked many years in retail and I love the look of perfectly folded displays. However, the KonMari Method suggests a different way of folding clothing which required a tweak to my previous habits.

Mastering the technique is pretty simple. Once you fold a few pieces, you develop a rhythm that sustains you through the pile. It kind of reminds me of when I used to spend an evening ironing. It’s almost like active meditation.

However, I’m the kind of person who likes to hang the majority of my wardrobe. To me, out of sight is out of mind. That may explain why my folded shirt drawers – although they look marvelous! – are in such great condition almost two years after their initial KonMari fold. Since the tops are no longer hanging, I forget I have them and often choose something else while I’m in the closet. On the upside, I was able to fit a large quantity of tops into two drawers which opened up hanging space for new purchases!

I’m not convinced that folding works for everything except dresses, coats and jackets or flowy tops. I feel a lot depends on fabric and frequency of use, and some items are too difficult or small to fold. I suspect that many people who have cleansed their wardrobes with the KonMari method will have relatively minimal wardrobes left so everything will get used regularly. That’s not me!

I opted to fold some items because, as I stated in one of my first posts on this journey, I wanted to more efficiently use the space I had, both in my closet and in my drawers. I have a lot of stuff to fit into a small space, so folding seems to make sense. Once I’ve had a chance to completely redo my closet, I’ll have a better idea of how it all works for me. My closet is supposed to be big enough for two and even after this initial cleaning, I’m having trouble fitting just me in it.

When you watch the videos of KonMari folding, everything looks wonderful when it’s initially folded and the drawer is full. To me, the issue is just how quickly it can get ugly once you start pulling items out. You have to regularly adjust what’s left to keep some semblance of organization.

I’ve seen on blogs several people who have absorbed the KonMari Method of folding, and use it not only at home but to pack their suitcases and set up their hotel rooms. I suspect, now that I’m utilizing this method, I’ll continue to do so for years to come, but I will also hang as much as I can.

I feel your relationship with your clothing is very personal but also something we all struggle with, particularly when it comes to organizing everything. We forget what we have which is why utilizing closet/clothing/style apps help. However, they do take time to maintain and I must admit, I’ve fallen away from using mine. I just have higher priorities at the moment, but I think they’re amazing aids and I wish I had mine updated.

Now, before I digress further, here are a few pointers regarding my KonMari folding experience.

  1. Watch videos. There are several on YouTube, not only by Kondo, but by several people who follow the KonMari Method. I highly recommend watching the videos before you begin your folding phase.
  2. Use plastic. I know Kondo suggests using leftover shoe boxes and lids for small item storage, but I much prefer plastic. Cardboard is susceptible to dust, bugs and dampness. Even in a drawer, cardboard gets dusty and dirty and is just too difficult to clean. Plastic can be washed and dried at will, and if you buy the clear plastic, you can actually see what’s in there. My vote is for plastic.
  3. Cut the tags. Kondo suggests cutting all tags so your clothes will feel wanted and part of your life. I’m paraphrasing here. Anyway, I struggled with this at first. Sometimes you like to know which tops are new, particularly when it comes to camis, tamis and tanks. There are times when you absolutely want to wear a new one, and once you cut the tags, that easily identifiable designation is gone. However, if you’re going to fold, you quickly discover that the tags get in the way. Even when I was sorting, the tags kept tangling. So, I caved, dug out the scissors and cut the tags.
  4. Look at the big picture. Once you’ve cleaned through all your clothes, they need to be organized in a manner that works for you. It might mean emptying everything – again! – so you can decide how best to locate your clothing. Coats in the coat closet. Pajamas in the night stand. Scarves on a hanger. Figure out how you’ll best utilize everything you own, then organize it that way. Not everything has to be folded.
  5. Fold smoothly. Be sure to smooth each item out before you fold it, otherwise the creases will likely remain. Some items are easier to do than others, and some, like pajamas, you might not care as much if there is a wrinkle or two.
  6. Fix what you see. The good thing about folding is that you do see every inch of an item you’re folding. Tears, snags, falling hemlines, and so on, become ever more obvious. Also, you can see when a piece of clothing needs to be tossed due to wear. I sadly donated a few shirts when I got up close and personal with them.
  7. Do what’s best for you. Remember, in the end, the KonMari Method is simply the suggestion of one organizer who wrote a book. Fold or not fold. Your clothing is up to you.

I’d love to hear your comments on how you’re adapting to KonMari folding and organizing your clothing. Leave your comments below!

Next up, more random thoughts and what I’ve learned so far. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

 

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #11 – Clothing Summary

Magic of Tidying Up

Well, I’ve completed all the categories when it comes to my clothing, so a quick summary of my work is in order. As for the tidying, i still have items in my closet that will be cleaned in future categories, so I haven’t completely tidied it yet. My dresser and nightstand drawers are in much more organized condition and remain that way, but the closet is still a work in progress. We’ll have to wait until i finish the whole house before I can show the difference. However, I wanted to touch on a few points regarding my clothing cleansing process. In case you’re wondering, I’m following the recommended category order detailed in Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing.

It’s possible there’s a major mind shift that takes place when you actually put all your clothes into one big pile. the overwhelming feeling of how much stuff we have just in clothing! Due to the limited amount of space I have, plus the fact that I take care of my Mom and it’s not possible to have a big mess all day just to satisfy Kondo’s requirements, it wasn’t practical for me to follow the KonMari method to the letter. Still, I was amazed at how much clothing I had in my wardrobe.

I think something else that happens when you put all your clothes into such a big pile is you realize that so much of what you own is not who you are. I didn’t have the big “Ah-hah!” moment because I did my discarding by sub-category, but even though I had already done a good purge about a year ago, looking at all my clothes within a short period, rather than just picking through the racks, showed me that i had several items that were good for me a few years ago but it just wasn’t who I am now.

As I write this, even though I’ve already driven my donations to the Goodwill and set aside a number of items to eBay, i’ve decided to let go of even more. Some items became more apparent once I started to catalog my wardrobe in the Stylebook app. Others came about because they nagged at me as they hung in the closet, or I decided to try on a few things and realized some shoes will always hurt and there’s just no getting over it no matter how much I love them. So, in addition to the tallies presented below, I’d say there will be an additional garbage bag and a number of eBay items to go into the pile. And, it feels good!

Here are the bags of clothing I donated to Goodwill.

I’ve noticed that now that i’ve pared down my wardrobe, I’m more creative in putting outfits together and I’m using items I rarely if ever used because I kept wearing the same things. The very first time I had to make a choice after I cleaned through my closet, I admit, I felt a bit of apprehension; I was definitely a bit anxious. I just took a deep breath and dove right in. It really wasn’t that scary after all. Now I challenge myself to wear different things. I pretty much have no choice. All the old stuff is gone.

One key reason for working through the KonMari method, at least regarding my closet, was that I wanted to make more efficient use of my space. Well, there’s less in it, but I’m not so sure I totally accomplished my goal. However, making my clothes look pretty is definitely an accomplishment! Folding items that need to be folded makes those areas look very organized. I often want to open my drawers to look at how neat everything is.

In my closet, I switched to the Huggable Hangers about two years ago. I couldn’t decide which color to get, so I went with gray. At the time, they didn’t offer a color that I wanted to use. Well…since then they introduced a vibrant violet purple! I was able to get enough hangers for my closet for a screamin’ deal and now my closet really vibrates with great energy.

Kondo mentions in her book that we should cut the tags from our clothes when we bring them home so they can fully feel part of our wardrobe. I hemmed and hawed about that for a while, in the end agreeing with her. As I was going through my hanging things, the tags kept getting tangled up; it was a nightmare. When it came time to fold, the tags would get in the way or snag. So, i dug out the scissors and cut the tags. Now my clothes are happier.

Kondo also suggests organizing your clothes from the heaviest and longest on the left to the shortest and lightest on the right. If I had just a simple closet on one wall, that might work. However, mine is two short walls and I need space on both of them. I always organized my clothes by category, and within each category I organized from light to dark, from short to long within each color. I think for the time being I’m going to continue to do so because I’ve done it that way for a number of years and it more easily fits my space.

These are some of the items I decided to keep.

I do have some evening gowns that I have no idea how to store. I love them and they bring me joy just to touch. However, they are long and bulky and can’t be hung due to their weight. Maybe once I’m done with the whole house I’ll figure it out.

In all, I parted with about 45 percent of my wardrobe. Maybe 50 percent. I’m still tossing. I had no idea I had that much that needed to go. My whole closet feels different when I slide open the door. It’s a really fabulous feeling, and once I get through the rest of the non-clothing that’s in my bedroom (when those categories come up), I just might accomplish my goal after all.

Before we get to books, I’ll still have a couple of posts on my thoughts on clothing per the KonMari method. Join my feed on Bloglovin’ or catch my Instagram posts to keep up to date.

Enjoy!

Cindi

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #10 – Accessories, Special Occasion Clothing and Shoes

Magic of Tidying Up

Yay!!! We’re at the last clothing category and they are three of my favorites. Which means, I’m going to have a hard time parting with anything. This post covers accessories, special occasion clothing and – wait for it – shoes! In case you’re wondering, I’m following the recommended category order detailed in Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing.

Accessories can be overwhelming! After all, it includes everything from jewelry (earrings, necklaces, bracelets, watches, pins) to scarves, gloves, hats, and belts. It’s a huge category! I suggest breaking this down into its sub-categories to make it easier to deal with. I kept putting off this part of the cleaning simply because i knew I’d have to look at every single earring i haven’t cleaned out for years! One issue I have is I’ve never found a storage/display solution for my jewelry so i tend to grab the same items over and over, which gets boring considering how many items I have.

Now, I don’t own much quality jewelry. but as i live a relatively casual lifestyle, i don’t need it and i don’t want to have to worry about it. Still, the items i have look fine and work for me. But there are a lot of them! This exercise was good for me to finally clean through and somewhat organize what I have. I only gave away 10-15 percent of my jewelry because I really love what I own. The problem is I can’t find it because I haven’t settled on a way to store it that works for me. Stylebook might help me here but I have so much I can’t imagine how long it would take me to even get them in the app. So, my search continues.

I have few scarves and belts, so I kept everything I own. I don’t wear them very often but they do bring me joy. Many of my scarves were purchased on trips overseas so there are memories that come to light when I wear them.

I was quite surprised to find that I owned 15 hats! I live in a warm climate so I don’t really need a lot of winter hats, and i try to stay out of the sun as much as possible since i have fair skin. I kept four hats and gave the rest away.

Gloves are another item i seldom use in this climate, although it can get chilly in the winter. I only had a few pair to go with my coats, so I kept them

Overall, accessories is the clothing category that took the longest. Sadly, i feel I need to go through my earrings again…

This was a big category – accessories, special occasion clothing and shoes!

Clothing for special occasions. I lead a pretty casual life at this point, mostly writing, blogging and taking care of my Mom, so my social calendar is not as full as it might be. There are invitations I must refuse simply because of my responsibilities. However, that doesn’t stop me from looking for awesome bargains for special occasions. You never know when you’ll need that special dress! Plus, I tend to dress in what I call classic with a twist, so basically timeless designs, worth the investment if I find something I love at a great price. Some people need to wear the latest and the greatest, and while I enjoy doing so, I don’t have to.

I tend to view designer gowns as works of art. I’ve been fascinated with gowns since I was a kid. I used to sketch eveningwear of my own design all the the time. Bling it out and I’m on board! I’m also fascinated by how inexpensive some gowns can be purchased on eBay if you’re willing to wait and search enough. As an example. in the past, I purchased a brand new $3,500 gown for $66. Yep, that’s right, $66! And, it was authentic! I’ve also found some pre-owned dresses for less than $100. Many society ladies buy beautiful designer gowns, wear them just a few hours for an event, then sell them. Buying them at a good price is better than renting! Even if you need to pay for alterations, you’re probably still thousands of dollars ahead for something really exquisite.

I know, I’m supposed to be explaining how I cleaned through my special occasion clothing, but as I looked at the mere 22 pieces I owned, memories of my spectacular deals came to mind. Just touching these works of art brings joy to me. I did sell two gowns that I thought weren’t really my taste even though they were beautiful, but the rest I’m keeping until I either wear them, share them or replace them. The biggest issue here is how to store these beaded numbers which are quite heavy and may need to be stored flat. But, that’s an issue for another day.

Shoes. I suspect most women have a weakness in one of the clothing categories, and it’s generally handbags or shoes. I like to think my handbag collection is small since I’ll use my daily handbag sometimes for years before replacing it (although I do have a number of clutches) whereas shoes are worn every day. So, for me, my weakness is shoes. On occasion, I’ve topped the 250 mark but I’d already downsized to about 88 when I began this cleaning.

I tend to clean  through my shoes regularly, so it surprised me when I found 20 pair to part with. When you have everything in a big pile, certain patterns emerge and those 20 belonged to a part of my past that no longer applied.. I hadn’t worn any of them in quite a long time, so it was easy to let them go. There were a couple pair that were brand new in the box, so those I sold on eBay. Looking through them all at once also made it clear what I was missing. I’ve since added a few new items to the stash, and there are one or two more I could use.

Well, that covers each of the clothing categories in detail. Up next, I’ll do a final analysis on this entire category, then another post on what I’ve learned through this process so far. There’s still a whole house to go! The next category to clean will be books, but I’ll get to that in a few posts. Thanks for joining me on this journey. There’s much more to come.

Enjoy!

Cindi

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

Cindi’s Thoughts – KonMari – Does your house have a set point?

Does your house have a set point?We often hear how our bodies have a set point for weight, that no matter how hard we try to lose, it will always work harder and harder to get back to a weight that it feels comfortable maintaining. Much the same, we try to keep our home organizing in check with the one in – one out rule: For every new item we bring into the house, something has to leave.

So, as I’ve been going through my house with the KonMari method, I noticed that as I was getting rid of things, others somehow were making their way into newly found spaces. I got rid of clothes and shoes, but I had to replace some and I added others. Not as much as I had before, definitely, but I felt a little on the skimpy side when I opened my closet doors after the initial cleanse.

It wasn’t only the closet that was affected. I now have a collection of photo props, things I might have considered tossing, or things I needed to buy, just to improve my business photography, plus other small tech items for my business.

Then, there are new sheets (I went all white) and a quilt because I’d been trying to replace one I received as a gift several years ago. When I found it, I felt joy. Isn’t that the whole point of this KonMari exercise – surround yourself with things that bring you joy? Now, it’s possible the things that bring you joy were buried under those that didn’t, but if that’s not the case, you will find a way to bring in the joy.

Once you clean through your house, you open up the space to allow new, wonderful things to happen. Want to learn to play guitar or keyboards? There’s room. How about learning to paint? An easel will fit. Need a home gym? There’s lots of space.

I’m sure when this whole house is KonMari-ed and I’ve finally sold everything I want to on eBay or Amazon or wherever, my house will have significantly less contents. And, I hope to be able to find and use everything I keep. After all, I quite enjoy the fresh air and free space I get when I clean an area and I have no intention of putting something new in its place.

Still, I wondered: How many of you have cleaned through your house and felt great, only to have to return to doing it again a year or two down the road? Kondo says that if you use her method, you won’t experience that again, but I don’t believe that. People change. Circumstances change. People move. Things break.

However, I think that once everything has a home and we’ve all developed new Kondo habits, we’ll be more aware when things are starting to get out of hand and address the issue quickly. List something on eBay immediately when we determine we no longer want it. Have a donation box in our closet. Throw something in the trash when it’s broken and not just relocate it to the garage. Sounds simple but will that initial KonMari elation fade over time?

To me, deep cleaning is like peeling back the layers of an onion. You remove the first layer or two of items you no longer want, only to realize you can go deeper and deeper still. Items you thought brought you joy actually don’t. Over time, you get better and better at realizing what makes you happy.

As the unjoyful leave us, there is room for the joyful to enter. I suspect there are people who feel the need to be surrounded by material possessions, but the point of KonMari is to connect with what you have. Items are not created to sit on a shelf or in a box. They are made to be used. Without the utility, the circle is not complete. Using might mean something as simple as enjoying a piece of artwork; if it’s hanging on the wall, it’s being used but if it’s sitting behind a dresser, not so much.

Not only should we surround ourselves with things that spark joy, we should be grateful for the joy that these items bring us. And, of course, remembering that the joy in life comes from many different places: relationships, experiences, even challenges.

But that brings us back to the opening question: does your house have a set point? In my heart, i believe homes can get along just fine with less filling. They just need to feel loved and experience love within their walls. What do you think?

Enoy!

Cindi

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #9 – Socks, underwear and handbags

Magic of Tidying Up

Ah…socks, underwear and handbags. Could we have a more exciting combination of clothing topics? Handbags, perhaps. Socks and underwear…not so much.

For those of you looking forward to some interesting photos for this post, well…I’m not going to share much here! I applaud the women who have chosen to share images of their intimates. Sorry, not me. But, when you start to see things like socks, underwear and handbags in the title, we at least have to be getting close to the end of KonMari-ing my clothing! In case you’re wondering, I’m following the recommended category order detailed in Marie Kondo’s book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing.

Socks, for sure, are a relatively boring category for me. I’d say I’ve spent 95 percent of my life sockless since I moved to California, and probably even more so since moving to Nevada. I like my feet to breathe and with the beautiful weather, it’s hard for me to even wear closed toe shoes. I’m perfectly content in flip flops (Havaianas) and sandals. However, I do recognize there are times – sport, professional, social – that require socks, but I’m more than willing to pare down what I have. No sense it taking up an entire drawer!

I had recently cleaned through my socks but, in spite of that, I still discarded about 30 percent. Now that some time has passed, I wish I had kept a few. I can’t say that socks bring me an immense amount of joy, given my penchant for Havaianas, but I had some that had never been worn that would have actually been good socks to keep in my emergency kit. Alas, they’re long gone to the Goodwill store by now and hopefully someone who truly needs them is making good use.

Marie Kondo suggests folding or rolling your socks and placing them in shoebox lids in your drawer to keep them tidy and organized. Hmm…not a fan. Shoe boxes are made of cardboard and cardboard attracts bugs and dust. So, after cleaning through my socks, I used empty clear plastic shoe boxes which were left over after tidying my shoes. They fit perfectly in my dresser drawers and they’re easy to clean.

Folding the socks was another issue. Have you ever tried to fold a pair of French terry sport socks? Not easy. Hard to roll as well. So, as you see in the photo, I left some of my socks flat and rolled the rest. I have to admit, getting rid of all the tags and cardboard from my new socks/hose really opened up some room and made things much tidier.

Pantyhose? We don’t need no stinkin’ pantyhose! Seems like forever since I wore any. In fact, some had been in my drawer unopened for so long i was afraid the elastic was dried out and just needed to be tossed. For years, the naked leg had taken center stage in society, for casual and formal occasions, but there has been a bit of pantyhose/tights resurgence with the popularity of Kate Middleton style. Either way, all the pantyhose I had got tossed, just due to age. I used to buy in bulk from Bloomingdale’s and Nordstrom, so it was sad to see so much money go to waste.

Socks and hose, all neat and organized.

Socks and hose, all neat and organized.

Undergarments are a tricky thing. Ask any woman, and the two articles of clothing that are probably the hardest to find that fit her properly are underwear and jeans. Inevitably, once you finally find that golden style of bra and panties, the company quits making it and your search begins anew.

I can’t say my undergarments necessarily bring me joy; they’re just something i need to have. (Hmm…maybe I need to do some shopping here…) In order to wear certain articles of clothing, we as women have to have the appropriate undergarments. So, tidying up this drawer was more a matter of determining their utility and condition more so than how much joy the item brings me. I tossed about 30 percent.

Handbags can easily become a dangerous weakness (read: huge expense category!) I’m typically the kind of person who purchases one or two really good handbags, then uses them for a long time. I’m not keen on switching bags very often. Or, I wasn’t until I read Kondo’s book and had a bonding session with my closet.

Well, actually, the shift started a couple of years ago when I got tired of the handbag I was using and suddenly found several I liked. I bought them all. (The perfect handbag can be just as hard to find as the perfect pair of shoes.) I also purchased several clutches, something I’d never done in the past. And, as I’ve cleaned through my closet, I noticed there were a number of outfits I didn’t wear simply because I didn’t have the proper handbag. Well, that’s easily solved!

One reason I don’t change purses very often is I hate transferring the contents from one to another, worried I’ll forget something important. Kondo suggests emptying the entire contents of your purse every night and putting it all in one place, so the next day when you select your handbag for the day, you can fill it with everything that’s important because you have it all together. I like that idea if you keep just a few items in your handbag, but I usually carry a store around in there. More on that in a future post! However, I have started carrying a wallet/crossbody/clutch in my tote so I can just grab and go when I know I don’t need everything and the kitchen sink! I’ll write a future post on my favorite mini sometime soon.

I did wean myself off a few clutches from my closet, but in the meantime, I purchased a few more. So, in the end, I’m probably even when it comes to handbags. I’m still planning to reorganize my closet once I’ve completed the whole house KonMari, so temporarily the handbags are just in a bin.

Handbags

Just a smidgen of my handbags and clutches. More once I reorganize my closet!

We’re nearing the end of the clothing categories, but there’s a whole house to complete! Thanks for joining me on this journey. There’s much more to come. Next up: accessories, clothes for specific events and shoes. Yay! Shoes!

Enjoy!

Cindi

This post contains affiliate links. It is not sponsored. All opinions are my own. Thanks!

 

Cindi’s Thoughts – Where to find me in 2016

binoculars

I like to think that everything we do somehow sets a foundation for our future life. We might not always see an immediate correlation, but somewhere along the line, our decisions today will affect our future tomorrow.

in 2015, I decided to consolidate my websites and to be more active on social media. The websites were easy; social media I’m still working on, although I have improved.

Previously, I had a separate website for each project under my creative hand. It just got too unwieldy to maintain an ever-growing list of projects and their accompanying sites. I finally got things down to what I hope will be a manageable four.

I’ve also tied my blog posts to Facebook and Twitter, so every time I have a new post, you’ll be alerted if you follow me on either one. So, I wanted to provide a breakdown of what you can find on each site.

www.CindiMaciolek.com – This is my main blog site. Here, you’ll find out things about me, my KonMari journey notes, recipes, favorite things and so on. It’s an all-encompassing Cindi Maciolek overview.

www.GrandArborPress.com – This is my business site. Anything related to my books, CDs or products can be found here.

www.Divatiel.com – Anyone who knows me knows I loved my little birdie so much I wrote a book about her. I have plans to do a few things with this down the line, so I’ve decided to keep it a separate site. That may change in the future, but for now, blog posts will be updated on my Facebook page but on a different Twitter account.

www.AuntiCindiPresents.com – This site is dedicated to my latest non-fiction book series. You’ll find blog posts here related to topics in my Aunti Cindi Presents books including business, caregiving and emergency preparedness tips. Emergency Preparedness was originally on my CindiMaciolek.com site, but I’ll be transferring  the content here. As other books are added to the series either by myself or other authors, the subject matter will grow.

You can also join my email list. I currently do not send regular updates via email, but I welcome you to add your name to my list.

Social Media

As I said, I’m not a social media expert while I understand its significance. All my blog posts will also post on Facebook and Twitter. In addition, in the last year I’ve opened Pinterest and Instagram accounts, both of which I hope to build on during 2016. I’m also toying with the idea of YouTube. Maybe somewhere down the line.

So, there you have it! If you’re looking for me, I’ll be on my laptop, fingers traveling a mile a minute, keeping you posted on random thoughts and somewhat useful information while I continue to focus on my books and other outlets for my writing.

See you in cyberspace!

Cindi

 

KonMari Method – My Tidying Journey #4 Random Thoughts

Magic of Tidying Up

The Sex and the City movie just happened to be on several nights in a row as I began my discarding process, and I felt a bit at odds with KonMari at the time. In her book,  The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing by Marie Kondo, Kondo advises that we should commune with our stuff in private and in complete silence.

In the movie, when Carrie cleans through the closet at her old apartment before moving in with Big, she has her three best friends with her – plus adorable little Lily – along with lots of champagne and great music to help guide her in deciding what should stay and what should go. Well, Carrie’s way seems so much more fun! Alas, I stuck to the KonMari way.

The KonMari Method is not that far off from my own personal experience with moving. During previous moves – including moving my Mom – I’d already begun to sort, discard and pack according to category, long before KonMari had made its way into my life. I started to sort  that way because it was too confusing and difficult to gauge how much of any item I had until I gathered like items all in one place, then eliminated as needed. So, in essence, I had begun doing a very similar tidying on my own. Still, this book helped me to take it one step further.

Moving is a great time to purge and if you have the time, do it well in advance. That way, you can pack all the vases, mementos, cookbooks and so on in the same boxes. That will make it so much easier to unpack at your new home. If you pack by room, the items might not go into the same room at your new place. Clothing, of course, is different, but you might decide to create a library and the books that once went into your office or master bedroom are now going into your magnificent new library.

One of the great things about the KonMari method is it takes you out of the mindset of looking for ways to display or store things and into questioning whether or not you need them in the first place. Also, by categorizing your belongings, you not only see the quantity of items you own, you can determine how many near-duplicates you have and just how many your lifestyle requires.

Kondo prompts us to ask ourselves about each item, “Does this spark joy?” I’ve added a caveat to that: “Am I willing to pay to move it?” If I don’t feel the least bit interested in paying to move it next time I move, it goes in the pile. That has taken me off the fence several times.

I  have to also admit that using the Stylebook app in conjunction with the closet cleanse has been a real eye-opener for me. Not only was I required to touch every single item in my wardrobe and choose what brings me joy, I also have an inventory which will help me to make better buying decisions in the future, as well as better utilizing my wardrobe in general. More on that when I discuss my closet in-depth.

Seems I’ve always had an eBay pile which has held up my tidying, but this time I’m going full force. i probably added another 30 items easily to the eBay pile just from my closet. Kondo doesn’t really cover the idea of selling your discards in her book, but in a transcript of a Q&A she gave which I found online, she said if it brings you joy to sell it, then do so, but it will take time and are you willing to put your joy on hold while you do? Good question but at the present time, I’d say it’s a yes for me.

One thought I had along the way is that, God forbid, should I not walk this earth tomorrow, all my belongings would just be stuff, stuff that gets donated or sold at a garage sale or parceled out among my family or trashed. So, while I may have an emotional attachment to an item, no one else probably will, at which point I have to ask myself, why should I? If something truly sparks joy, that’s not an issue. It’s always the things we ruminate about that are the culprits, energy wasters, power takers.

Kondo solves the problem of where to begin. Other books offer alternative methods of cleaning and organizing, and I have found a few that delve into the psychology of why we have what we have. But Kondo uses a very pragmatic approach to discover which belongings truly bring us joy, and provides a gameplan to attack in a specific order. Does she answer all my questions as I’m going through the process? No, but it’s OK to think for ourselves and that’s part of the reason I started to blog about it. You  might have similar questions.

I’m very excited to be on this journey, and I hope that you’ll be inspired to begin your own and to share your thoughts. I can’t wait to see how much I’ve discarded in the end!

So, enough talking, let’s get to work! Next up: Clothing.

Enjoy!

Cindi